More About David Gardner

It’s my belief that people inherit a sense of humor the way they inherit other traits. Some families are tall (not mine), comely (nope), smart (we try), or take a joy in laughing (yup). As the youngest of three children, I had to be funny to get any attention.

And now my son and daughter are a lot funnier than I am. I’m not certain how I feel about that.

I love to laugh, and I love to make people laugh whenever I can—the mailman, the grocery clerk, friends and even people I don’t like all that much. 

So I try to put humor into my novels.

But you’ll also find parts that aren’t so much fun (life isn’t one long joke, is it?). My protagonists carry scars from childhood. I have scars, and I’ll bet you do too, but I hope yours aren’t as deep as those of my protagonists. One caused the death of the grandfather who had raised him, another killed a boxer in the ring, a third shot an abusive stepfather. We novelists are hard on our characters. Someone once wrote that, if life has become too easy for your protagonist, break their arm.

I like happy endings, however. Or at least satisfying ones. No children die in my books, no seniors pass on just because they’re seniors, no animals perish. A bad guy gets snuffed out from time to time, often in a most disagreeable fashion, but I’m sure you’ll agree they had it coming.

So that’s it. My novels won’t change your life, but you’ll be entertained for a few hours and maybe even laugh out loud. We need that in these times.